Geographia Polonica

Geographia Polonica has been published since 1964; in the years 1964–1998 as a serial publication. Since 1999 – as a journal with two issues per year (Spring and Autumn), and since 2012 there are four issues per year. Contributions to the journal on both human and physical geography topics as well as related fields (e.g. urban and regional planning, ecology) should be submitted to the Editor. Papers dealing with Central and Eastern Europe are particularly welcomed.

News

Special issues for 2014 IGU Regional Conference and 50th anniversary of the founding of Geographia Polonica

tl_files/gp/zajawka.jpgWe have great pleasure in inviting you to read the contents of this special issue of Geographia Polonica as well as the upcoming one (vol. 87, issues 2 and 3 of 2014). The special issues have been prepared to coincide with Krakow’s hosting of the 2014 IGU Regional Conference. However, this year also marks a second important occasion for us - the 50th anniversary of the founding of Geographia Polonica. At the same time it is our hope that the two issues will represent that most important voice in geography since the changes in our editorial team at the beginning of 2012, with special attention being paid in many cases to Central and Eastern Europe (including Poland). Our idea in this case has been to compile and present a series of articles written by key persons of the IGU (i.e. Chairs of the IGU Commissions, and Vice-Presidents of the IGU). My vision was for the Commission Chairs to each prepare and publish an article – theoretical or empirical, or even an essay, concerning the stage that has currently been reached by his/her field of interest (Commission subject/sub-discipline), some of the new trends therein, and future directions of research.

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CALL FOR PAPERS: Central and Eastern Europe a quarter of a century after the fall of the Iron Curtain. The outcome of change.

tl_files/igipz/ZPZ/foto_news/mur.jpgThe political breakthrough in 1989 set in motion a range of processes that would fundamentally transform the organisation and functioning of spatial systems across Central Europe. More than two decades later, we want to take stock of this broad-ranging change in their social, economic and environmental dimensions.  A volume entitled “Central and Eastern Europe a quarter of a century after the fall of the Iron Curtain. The outcome of change” is planned as a comprehensive analysis and evaluation of the phenomena, processes and patterns that emerged in the post-communist EU member states.

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CALL FOR PAPERS: Tourism and Transition in a Time of Change

tl_files/igipz/ZPZ/foto_news/turystyka.jpgThe IGU Commission on Tourism, Leisure and Global Change, in cooperation with the Polish Geographical Society, IGiPZ PAN and GEOGRAPHIA POLONICA is using the occasion of the IGU 2014 Regional Conference in Krakow to organize the conference (pre-conference meeting) entitled “Tourism and Transition in a Time of Change”. The conference will be held in Southern Poland (13-17 August 2014). The conference will start and end in Krakow. During the conference participants are transferred to the Pieniny Mts at the Polish-Slovak border.

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Current Issue

Geographia Polonica (2014) vol. 87, iss. 2

Preface

Editorial

Marek Więckowski

Geographia Polonica (2014) vol. 87, iss. 2, pp. 177-178 | Full text

Further information

Keywords:

Marek Więckowski [marekw@twarda.pan.pl], Institute of Geography and Spatial Organization Polish Academy of Sciences Twarda 51/55, 00‑818 Warsaw: Poland

Articles

The achievements and future potential of applied quantitative geography: A case study

Mark Birkin, Graham Clarke, Martin Clarke, Alan Wilson

Geographia Polonica (2014) vol. 87, iss. 2, pp. 179-202 | Full text
doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.7163/GPol.2014.11

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Abstract:

There has been much debate about the usefulness of human geography for public and private sector planning.In this paper we make the case in terms of quantitative analysis in geography. We provide a wealth of applicationsof applied research from the perspective of one team of quantitative geographers – based in the Schoolof Geography at the University of Leeds. This research is rooted in spatial interaction modelling, microsimulation,spatial optimisation and geodemographics. A number of applications are explored and their benefitsarticulated – for end-users. i.e. planners in the broadest sense of the word, the University and the School, forstudents and, more broadly, for the research environment within applied spatial analysis.

Keywords: applied quantitative geography, spatial interaction, microsimulation, optimization, geodemographics, GIS, benefits of applied geography

Mark Birkin, Chair of the IGU Commission on Applied Geography
Graham Clarke, University of Leeds School of Geography LS2 9JT Leeds: United Kingdom
Martin Clarke, University of Leeds School of Geography LS2 9JT Leeds: United Kingdom
Alan Wilson, University College London

Emerging frontiers, challenges and changing professional avenues for geographers in the contemporary world

Ram Babu Singh

Geographia Polonica (2014) vol. 87, iss. 2, pp. 203-212 | Full text
doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.7163/GPol.2014.12

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Abstract:

Geography studies the characteristics of space and place. Geography answers questions such as where things, activities or phenomena are located, why they are located there, how the features and activities interact, and what factors cause this distribution. An ideal geographer exercises both scientific and social analytical skills. Geography has been called a bridge between human and physical sciences. In the beginning, geography focussed on the physical aspects of the earth but modern geography is an all-encompassing discipline that seeks to understand the earth and all of its human and natural complexities as an integrating science. The paper deals with changing professional avenues for geographers, the role of geography towards the future earth and human geosciences together with the role the IGU can play in the Future of World Geography.

Keywords: geography, global challenges, opportunities, future earth, IGU

Ram Babu Singh, University of Delhi Department of Geography 110007, Delhi: India

Towards an international approach for geography education

Joop Van der Schee, John Lidstone, Clare Brooks

Geographia Polonica (2014) vol. 87, iss. 2, pp. 213-220 | Full text
doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.7163/10.7163/GPol.2014.13

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Abstract:

‘Geography education is indispensable to the development of responsible and active citizens in the present and future world’ is one of the main statements in the International Charter on Geographical Education. This charter was edited in 1992 by Haubrich, chair of the Commission on Geographical Education of the International Geographical Union (IGU). Twenty years later this statement is still true. Geography educators all over the world are looking for ways to talk with young people about their image of their world and to help them to develop their knowledge, skills and ideas about the complex world we live in. However, different ideas exist about what geography we should learn and teach and how. The Commission on Geographical Education of the International Geographical Union tries to help to improve the quality and position of geography education worldwide, promoting the dissemination of good practices and research results in the field of geography education.

Keywords: geography education, children´s geographies, Rome declaration, research in geographical education, international co-operation

Joop Van der Schee, Faculty of Geosciences University of Utrecht Heidelberglaan 2, 3584 CS Utrecht: The Netherlands
John Lidstone, Cultural and Language Studies in Education Queensland University of Technology Victoria Park Road, Kelvin Grove, Brisbane, Queensland 4059: Australia
Clare Brooks, Institute of Education University of London 20 Bedford Way, London WC1H 0AL: United Kingdom

Biogeography in the early twenty-first century: A science with increasing significance to Earth’s changes and challenges

Udo Schickhoff, Mark A. Blumler, Andrew C. Millington

Geographia Polonica (2014) vol. 87, iss. 2, pp. 221-240 | Full text
doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.7163/GPol.2014.14

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Abstract:

Biogeography is, in essence, the geography of nature or more specifically, the study of the distribution of Earth’s life forms at all spatial and temporal scales. This paper traces the historical development of biogeography from ancient times to the twenty-first century, highlights contemporary trends and expansions, and previews future prospects. The cumulative discovery of biogeographic patterns culminated in the development of the theory of evolution – biogeography’s greatest contribution to science. The paradigm shift to causal approaches in the early twentieth century led to ecological biogeography emerging as the second pillar of biogeography in additionto historical biogeography. Fostered by the acceptance of plate tectonics, the equilibrium theory of islandbiogeography, the rapid advancement of new perspectives and methods in historical biogeography, and revolutionary advances in compiling, visualizing, and analyzing spatially explicit information, biogeography evolved into a rigorous science during the second half of the twentieth century. Currently, major active sub-fields arephylo geography, macroecology, and conservation biogeography. Biogeography is on the way to becoming a ‘bigscience’, entering an era of increasingly integrative and multi-faceted approaches, increasingly accessible andavailable data, tools, and techniques, and interdisciplinary collaboration. Given unprecedented human impacts and the dramatic transformation of the Earth system, biogeography matters more than ever, both in the discoveryand in the conservation of biodiversity.

Keywords: biodiversity, biogeographic patterns, conservation, distribution, ecology, history, interdisciplinarity, macroecology, phylogeography

Udo Schickhoff, Chair of the IGU Commission on Biogeography and Biodiversity
Mark A. Blumler, University of Hamburg Institute of Geography CEN Center for Earth System Research and Sustainability
Andrew C. Millington, University of Hamburg Institute of Geography CEN Center for Earth System Research and Sustainability

A world without GIS? Post-GIS futures for the New Millennium

Francis Harvey

Geographia Polonica (2014) vol. 87, iss. 2, pp. 241-250 | Full text
doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.7163/10.7163/GPol.2014.15

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Abstract:

We stand on the cusp of an era when anyone with internet access can make a map. With six billion mobilephone subscribers and 2.3 billion internet users will GIS play much of a role in how make and use maps? This paper begins with this question and explores some of the dimensions of how GIS will change in a new world – a world where GIS is integral to countless online activities and hence disappears from most uses. This is world not without GIS, but a post-GIS world of ubiquitous location technologies. While many of these developments,they have negative potential and the article points to areas to consider carefully.

Keywords: GIS, information society, internet, data-driven science, ubiquitous computing

Francis Harvey, University of Minnesota, Department of Geography, Environment and Society, MN 55455, Minneapolis: USA

Will geography remain geography? Pondering the state of geography

Antoni Jackowski

Geographia Polonica (2014) vol. 87, iss. 2, pp. 251-265 | Full text
doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.7163/10.7163/GPol.2014.16

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Abstract:

For decades, we have been witnessing a gradual disintegration of geography. The issue was first flagged at the turn of the 19th century, but the process accelerated in the late 1960s. The term ‘geography’ has been increasingly replaced with other terms and one of the effects has been a diminishing status of geography in public awareness. Polish geographers attempted to address the problem as early as in the first decades of the 20th century, but these efforts, especially before 1939, remain obscure. Researchers continued their work even during the Second World War when they were often operating in extreme conditions. This scientific heritage has a potential to be used in contemporary work on a new view of geography at a time of increasing globalisation.

Keywords: geography, Polish geography, disintegration, history of geography, Poland

Antoni Jackowski, Jagiellonian University Institute of Geography and Spatial Management ul. Gronostajowa 7, 30–387 Krakow: Poland

Changes, challenges and responsibilities in geographical education: The International Geography Olympiad

Lex Chalmers, Kathryn Berg

Geographia Polonica (2014) vol. 87, iss. 2, pp. 267-276 | Full text
doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.7163/10.7163/GPol.2014.17

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Abstract:

Geography has never been so accessible; new media present documentaries about diverse places, supported by travelogues that ask intriguing questions, with superb imagery of natural and cultural features, all supported by emerging digital cartographies. These geographies reach many more people than the well-cited texts of 19th century geographers such as Humboldt and Ritter, yet the paradox is that contemporary Geography is not identified as a critical part of the educational entitlement of young people. The essay explores this paradox with reference to the changes in education in the last 150 years and a commentary on the scholars and institutional frameworks that share responsibility for the current and future status of the discipline. Since 1996 the International Geographical Union (IGU) has accepted a key challenge faced by Geography; the process of fostering the regeneration of the discipline by engaging young people. The IGU has supported ten International Geography Olympiads since 1996, with the eleventh Olympiad scheduled for Cracow in 2014. The essay outlines the nature of the Olympiad where field trips and cultural activities provide an unparalleled experience for young scholars exhibiting international excellence in Geography. These young people are our future.

Keywords: young geographers, geographical education, International Geography Olympiad, Cracow, International Geographical Union, International Year of Global Understanding

Lex Chalmers, University of Waikato Geography, Tourism & Environmental Planning 3210, Hamilton: New Zealand
Kathryn Berg, Royal Geographical Society of Queensland 237 Milton Rd, 4064 Queensland: Australia

50 Years of Geographia Polonica

Geographia Polonica: A window onto the world. An interview with Professor Leszek Antoni Kosiński

Leszek Kosiński, Przemysław Śleszyński

Geographia Polonica (2014) vol. 87, iss. 2, pp. 277-294 | Full text
doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.7163/GPol.2014.21

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Abstract:

To mark the 50th anniversary of Geographia Polonica, we are publishing an interview with Professor Leszek Antoni Kosiński, who was a member of its first editorial team.

Keywords:

Leszek Kosiński, Institute of Geography PAN, Warsaw
Przemysław Śleszyński [psleszyn@twarda.pan.pl], Institute of Geography and Spatial Organization Polish Academy of Sciences Twarda 51/55, 00-818 Warsaw: Poland

Varia

80 years after the 14th Congress of the International Geographical Union in Warsaw, 23–31 August 1934

Antoni Jackowski, Elżbieta Bilska-Wodecka, Izabela Sołjan

Geographia Polonica (2014) vol. 87, iss. 2, pp. 295-308 | Full text
doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.7163/GPol.2014.18

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Abstract:

In 1934, the International Geographical Union arrived in Warsaw to attend its Congress which was held between 23rd and 31st August. A decision to accept the offer of the Polish government and meet for the first time in a Slavic country was taken at the previous Congress in Paris, in 1931. The Congress was attendedby 693 participants from 44 countries, including 350 from Poland. The programme included 12 regional and thematic excursions and several cartographic exhibitions. Four volumes of Comptes Rendus du Congrès Internationalde Géographie containing the proceedings of the Congress were published between 1935 and 1938.

Keywords: history of geography, international geographical congress, International Geographical Union, Warsaw, Poland

Antoni Jackowski, Jagiellonian University Institute of Geography and Spatial Management ul. Gronostajowa 7, 30–387 Krakow: Poland
Elżbieta Bilska-Wodecka, Jagiellonian University Institute of Geography and Spatial Management ul. Gronostajowa 7, 30–387 Krakow: Poland
Izabela Sołjan, Jagiellonian University Institute of Geography and Spatial Management ul. Gronostajowa 7, 30–387 Krakow: Poland

Poles in the International Geography Olympiad (iGeo)

Marek Barwiński, Tomasz Sawicki, Joanna Uroda

Geographia Polonica (2014) vol. 87, iss. 2, pp. 309-316 | Full text
doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.7163/10.7163/GPol.2014.19

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Abstract:

The article presents the nearly 20-year-long history of the International Geography Olympiad (iGeo) – from a modest start with 5 participating countries during the 1st Olympiad in the Hague, the Netherlands, to the 11th Olympiad that will be held this year in Kraków, Poland. The arrival of 37 teams from 5 continents has been confirmed. Poland has participated in all the iGeo’s. Polish participants finished in the top places several times, both individually and as a team. These results showcase the high standards of the Polish students and their teachers as well as the effectiveness of the geography education provided in Poland.

Keywords: geographical education, iGeo, International Geographical Union, International Geography Olympiad, Poland

Marek Barwiński, University of Łódź Faculty of Geographical Sciences Kopcińskiego 31, 90-142 Łódź: Poland
Tomasz Sawicki, International Geographical Union Olympiad Task Force Podbipięty 2, 02-732 Warsaw: Poland
Joanna Uroda, University of Warsaw Faculty of Geology Żwirki i Wigury 93, 02-089 Warsaw: Poland

Poland on maps

Delimitation and typology of functional urban regions in Poland based on commuting, 2006

Przemysław Śleszyński

Geographia Polonica (2014) vol. 87, iss. 2, pp. 317-320 | Full text
doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.7163/GPol.2014.20

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Abstract:

This study presents the delimitation of functional urban regions in Poland modified using the Nyusten-Daceymethod based on the data regarding commuting in 2006. The modification involved establishing an administrative and settlement hierarchy to serve as the basis on which the order of precedence of flows to individual communes was determined, and supplementing it with the combination of inflows and outflows in a given hubregion. A total of 456 individual regions were isolated, including 1 capital region, 21 regional, 54 sub-regional, 212 local (powiat), and 168 other local regions.

Keywords: functional urban region, daily urban system, commuting, Nystuen-Dacey method, Poland

Przemysław Śleszyński [psleszyn@twarda.pan.pl], Institute of Geography and Spatial Organization Polish Academy of Sciences Twarda 51/55, 00-818 Warsaw: Poland