Roman Matykowski

Articles

Polish Economic Migrants In Ireland, 2004-2007

Roman Matykowski, Alicja Andrzejewska

Geographia Polonica (2012) vol. 85, iss. 1, pp. 33-43 | Full text
doi: https://doi.org/10.7163/GPol.2012.1.3

Further information

Abstract:

On the accession of Poland (and nine other states) to the European Union on 1 May 2004, three countries decided to open fully their labourmarkets to Poles (United Kingdom, Ireland, Sweden). Even before that date, Poles emigrated to various European countries in searchof seasonal work, especially in agriculture (e.g. collecting fruits and vegetables), either relying on their German passports (e.g. residentsof Silesia) or working illegally. There were several factors that made the labour market of the British Isles particularly popular with Poles,including their knowledge (even if, for some, it was relatively poor) of English, especially among the young (in the 1990s it became thebasic and dominant foreign language taught at Polish schools), and the relatively high earnings. This is why research was conducted onPolish economic migration to the Republic of Ireland in the initial stage of the opening of its labour market, i.e. in the years 2004-2007.The potential difference model was employed to delimit the leading areas attracting Polish migrants to Ireland. The Polish migrant ischaracterised on the basis of the survey research that has been conducted, and the various manifestations of the socio-cultural life ofPoles in Ireland are identified. An analysis is also made of the facilities catering to Polish migrants in the urban space of Cork, one ofthe major clusters of Poles outside the Irish capital.

Keywords: economic emigration, potential difference model, Ireland, Little Poland

Roman Matykowski, Adam Mickiewicz University Institute of Socio-Economic Geography and Spatial Management Dzięgielowa 27, 61-680 Poznań: Poland
Alicja Andrzejewska, Adam Mickiewicz University Institute of Socio-Economic Geography and Spatial Management Dzięgielowa 27, 61-680 Poznań: Poland

Polish presidential electionof 2010: a study of the power of voters in big and medium-sized towns

Roman Matykowski, Katarzyna Kulczyńska

Geographia Polonica (2011) vol. 84, iss. 2, pp. 93-113 | Full text
doi: https://doi.org/10.7163/GPol.2011.2.7

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Abstract:

In the literature on the subject, urbanisation is regarded as one of the most impor-tant factors shaping electoral behaviour. The effect of this factor has also been corroborated by studies in Poland, where one can speak of urban- and rural-oriented parties. To determine the significance of the urban electorate in Poland, use was made of the procedure of backward elimi-nation of voters in the successive biggest towns. The next step involved identifying the structure of support for the leading presidential contenders in the 2010 election at each stage of the rank elimination of the towns. It was already in the parliamentary elections at the start of the 21st century that big cities and the larger of medium-sized towns turned out to be their 'engines': with their highest voter turnouts, they crucially affected the results at the national scale. That is why an analysis was made of voter alignment in towns of this size category over the years 2001-2007, and on this basis various electoral types of towns were distinguished.

Keywords: big and medium-sized towns, electoral types of towns, Poland

Roman Matykowski, Adam Mickiewicz University Institute of Socio-Economic Geography and Spatial Management Dzięgielowa 27, 61-680 Poznań: Poland