Piotr Migoń

Articles

Physico-geographical mesoregions of Poland: Verification and adjustment of boundaries on the basis of contemporary spatial data

Jerzy Solon, Jan Borzyszkowski, Małgorzata Bidłasik, Andrzej Richling, Krzysztof Badora, Jarosław Balon, Teresa Brzezińska-Wójcik, Łukasz Chabudziński, Radosław Dobrowolski, Izabela Grzegorczyk, Miłosz Jodłowski, Mariusz Kistowski, Kot Rafał, Paweł Krąż, Jerzy Lechnio, Andrzej Macias, Anna Majchrowska, Ewa Malinowska, Piotr Migoń, Urszula Myga-Piątek, Jerzy Nita, Elżbieta Papińska, Jan Rodzik, Małgorzata Strzyż, Sławomir Terpiłowski, Wiesław Ziaja

Geographia Polonica (2018) vol. 91, iss. 2, pp. 143-170 | Full text
doi: https://doi.org/10.7163/GPol.0115

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Abstract:

The programme of identification, cataloguing and evaluation of Polish landscapes, part of the implementation of the European Landscape Convention, has caused an increase in interest in physico-geographical regionalisation over recent years. The commonly accepted regionalisation of Poland developed by J. Kondracki (Kondracki & Richling 1994) is sufficient for work at an overview scale (e.g. 1:500,000), whereas its spatial accuracy is too low to make use of it for the purpose of Polish landscape cataloguing. The aim of this article is to present a more up-to-date and detailed division of Poland into mesoregions, adjusted to the 1:50,000 scale. In comparison with older work, the number of mesoregions has increased from 316 to 344. In many cases, somefar-reaching changes in meso- and macroregions were made. Nevertheless, in most cases the previous system of units was maintained, with more detailed adjustment of boundaries based on the latest geological andgeomorphological data and the use of GIS tools for the DEM analysis. The division presented here is a creatively developing new work aligning the proposals of the majority of Polish researchers. At the same time, it is a regionalisation maintaining the idea of the work developed by J. Kondracki as well as his theoretical assumptions and the criteria used to distinguish units, which makes it a logical continuation of his regional division.

Keywords: regionalisation, spatial units, boundaries of regions, Poland

Jerzy Solon [j.solon@twarda.pan.pl], Institute of Geography and Spatial Organization Polish Academy of Sciences, 00-818 Warsaw, Twarda 51/55, Poland
Andrzej Richling, Warsaw University
Piotr Migoń, Institute of Geography and Regional Development University of Wrocław pl. Uniwersytecki 1, 50-137 Wrocław: Poland
Urszula Myga-Piątek, University of Silesia Faculty of Earth Sciences Będzińska 60, 41-200 Sosnowiec: Poland
Jerzy Nita, University of Silesia Faculty of Earth Sciences Będzińska 60, 41-200 Sosnowiec: Poland

Controlling factors limiting timberline position and shifts in the Sudetes: A review

Vaclav Treml, Piotr Migoń

Geographia Polonica (2015) vol. 88, iss. 2, pp. 55-70 | Full text
doi: https://doi.org/10.7163/GPol.0015

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Abstract:

Three isolated massifs in the Sudetes, Central Europe, are elevated sufficiently high to allow for the development of the treeline ecotone. These are the Karkonosze/Krkonoše in the West Sudetes and Hruby Jeseník and Masyw Śnieżnika/Králický Sněžnik in the East Sudetes. The upper limit of closed tree stands (i.e. timberline) is locatedat c. 1250 m a.s.l. on average in the Krkonoše, but with significant variability spanning more than 500 m. In the East Sudetes the respective elevation is higher, above 1300 m a.s.l., and the variability is smaller. While temperature is the primary factor governing the uppermost tree stands, second-order climatic factors play an important role in shaping treeline ecotone position, particularly wind and snow accumulation patterns. Active surface processes such as debris flows and snow avalanches force the timberline to descend and account for its locally very irregular course. There is a history of long-term human impact on the position of the timberline, with its peak in the 17-19th centuries when high-mountain meadows were extensively used for grazing and haymaking. In the last century the overall trend of timberline ascent associated with abandonment of agricultural land and temperature rise has been interrupted by the episode of catastrophic forest decline due to air pollution.

Keywords: treeline ecotone, Karkonosze, Hrubý Jeseník, Masyw Śnieżnika, mountain ecology

Vaclav Treml, Department of Physical Geography and Geoecology Charles University in Prague Albertov 6, CZ-128 43 Prague: Czech Republic
Piotr Migoń, Institute of Geography and Regional Development University of Wrocław pl. Uniwersytecki 1, 50-137 Wrocław: Poland

Geomorphic diversity of the Sudetes - effects of structure and global change superimposed

Piotr Migoń

Geographia Polonica (2011) vol. 84, Special Issue Part 2, pp. 93-105 | Full text
doi: https://doi.org/10.7163/GPol.2011.S2.7

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Abstract:

The Sudetes are mountains of outstanding geomorphic diversity. Reasons reside inlithological and structural variability of bedrock and protracted history of landscape evolutionspanning at least the entire Cenozoic. Over this time span, global changes have exerted a keycontrol on the geomorphic evolution of the Sudetes. Late Cenozoic mountain building in theAlpine-Carpathian region induced differential uplift of the Sudetes and radically changed itsgeomorphic environment, from one typified by a landscape of low relief to one of increasingrelief energy and accelerated erosion. Environmental changes were equally profound but theirgeomorphic effect is less obvious, except for the widespread presence of periglacial landformsof Pleistocene age and localized occurrence of glacial cirques and moraines in the KarkonoszeMts. At the same time, rock control on the location and shape of individual landforms is evidentand large tracts of the Sudetes may be described as having structural morphology. Therefore,unequivocal recognition of relief generations in the Sudetes is problematic.

Keywords: geomorphology, geodiversity, global change, rock control, the Sudetes

Piotr Migoń, Institute of Geography and Regional Development University of Wrocław pl. Uniwersytecki 1, 50-137 Wrocław: Poland

High-mountain Elements in the Geomorphology of the Sudetes, the Bohemian Massif, and Their Significance

Piotr Migoń

Geographia Polonica (2008) vol. 81, iss. 1, pp. 101-116 | Full text

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Abstract:

The forested mountains ranges of the Bohemian Massif, including the Sudetes, typifymoderately high mountain geomorphology (Mittelgebirge). However, the most elevated partsof the Sudetes also have landscape elements more readily associated with high-mountain relief.These include sub-alpine meadows and bare regolith-covered slopes, a multitude of relict periglaciallandforms, as well as inherited Pleistocene glacial landforms. The present-day geomorphologicalactivity in the terrain located at and above the timberline is much more evident thanthat recorded in the lower forested belt. Debris flows triggered by occasional downpours arethe most potent geomorphic agents, also influencing hydrological conditions and vegetation patterns.Avalanches play a further role in determining the position of the timberline, but rockfallsare very rare. The contemporary development of certain small-scale periglacial landforms hasbeen recognized, and close correspondence is found to exist between the tiered structure of morphogeneticdomains recognized in the Carpathians and the highest massifs in the Sudetes.

Keywords: high mountains, geomorphology, glaciation, debris flows, Sudetes, Bohemian Massif

Piotr Migoń, Institute of Geography and Regional Development University of Wrocław pl. Uniwersytecki 1, 50-137 Wrocław: Poland

Book review

Environmental Change in Mountains and Uplands by M. Beniston, 172 pp., Arnold, London, 2000

Piotr Migoń

Geographia Polonica (2001) vol. 74, iss. 2, pp. 91-94 | Full text

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Piotr Migoń, Institute of Geography and Regional Development University of Wrocław pl. Uniwersytecki 1, 50-137 Wrocław: Poland

Articles

Inherited landforms in the crystalline areas of the Sudetes Mts. A case study from the Jelenia Góra Basin, SW Poland

Piotr Migoń

Geographia Polonica (1992) vol. 60, pp. 123-136 | Full text

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Abstract:

Inselbergs are the most striking feature of the granite scenery of the Jelenia Góra Basin. They are either lithologically or fracture controlled. The former are built up of more resistant types of the granite (aplogranite, equigranular granite), while the latter reflect mostly the occurrence of domical structures. Therefore they could be considered as bornhardts. The properties of granite, which forms bornhardts indicate, that the selective deep weathering of Tertiary age following or accompanying by stripping was the most important morphogenetic process leading to the origin and exposure of the residual hills. After the exposure bornhardts were developed in changing morphoclimatic conditions. The formerly steep-sided, bare slopes were remodelled to the form of the boulder-controlled slopes due to strong physical disintegration of domes in the dry environments. The age of this process is probably Late Miocene. Both Pliocene and Pleistocene morphogenesis, which took place respectively in temperate and cold conditions, did not change the inselberg landscape considerably.

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Piotr Migoń, Institute of Geography and Regional Development University of Wrocław pl. Uniwersytecki 1, 50-137 Wrocław: Poland