Jarosław Baranowski

Articles

Regional features of the bioclimate of Central and Southern Europe against the background of the Köppen-Geiger climate classification

Krzysztof Błażejczyk, Jarosław Baranowski, Gerd Jendritzky, Anna Błażejczyk, Peter Bröde, Dusan Fiala

Geographia Polonica (2015) vol. 88, iss. 3, pp. 439-453 | Full text
doi: https://doi.org/10.7163/GPol.0027

Further information

Abstract:

This paper presents an application of the Universal Thermal Climate Index UTCI to studies of regional variability in human-biometeorological conditions. The variability in question was assessed by reference to selected meteorological stations representing Central and Southern Europe, i.e. Kołobrzeg, Warsaw and Świeradów (in Poland), Prague, Budapest, Ljubljana, Milan, Rome and Athens, with the bioclimatic features characterising these localities being presented against the background of the Köppen-Geiger climate classification. In line with that classification, the first five stations are found to represent the cold climate zones (Dfb, Dfc). The last four stations are in turn located in the temperate climate zones (Cfa, Cfb, Csa). Seasonal changes in UTCI values and the frequency of occurrence of UTCI categories are discussed. Significant regional differences in bioclimatic characteristics were found between the stations representing various types of climate. While the highest summer values for UTCI are very similar at all stations (39-42°C), the frequency of occurrence of days with at least strong heat stress (SHS) varied from 2% at the coastal station of Kołobrzeg in Poland to more than 50% at the Milan, Rome and Athens stations. In winter the lowest UTCI values are much differentiated regionally, from -54°C at the mountain station in Świeradów, Poland,to -22°C in Rome. In the zone of cold climate, the frequency of occurrence of days with at least strong coldstress (SCS) is >40%, while in the temperate climates, strong cold stress is characteristic of less than 2% of winter days.

Keywords: human bioclimate, Universal Thermal Climate Index, Köppen-Geiger climate classification, seasonal and regional variability of bioclimate

Krzysztof Błażejczyk [k.blaz@twarda.pan.pl], Institute of Geography and Spatial Organization Polish Academy of Sciences Twarda 51/55, 00-818 Warsaw: Poland
Jarosław Baranowski [j.bar@twarda.pan.pl], Institute of Geography and Spatial Organization Polish Academy of Sciences, 00-818 Warsaw, Twarda 51/55, Poland
Peter Bröde, Leibniz Research Centre for Working Environment and Human Factors (IfADo) Ardeystr 67, D-44139 Dortmund: Germany
Dusan Fiala, ErgonSim-Comfort Energy Efficiency Holderbuschweg 47, D-70563 Stuttgart: Germany

Energy exchange in an active layer in the Kocioł Kasprowy (Tatra Mountains)

Jarosław Baranowski

Geographia Polonica (2004) vol. 77, iss. 1, pp. 35-44 | Full text

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Abstract:

The studies were done between 8th and 20th August 1998, in an area extending between 1820 and 1880 m a.s.l. (located in the altitudinal zone of alpine vegetation). The study location named Kocioł Kasprowy is the corrie on the upper part of the slope. The magnitude of the heat flux in the active layer was measured with a heat flux sensor of diameter 5 cm, placed on special stands close to the soil surface. The research showed that factors other than incident solar radiation having a major influence on the size of the energy flux flowing through the active layer are site exposure and inclination. The work confirmed that the frequency of occurrence and amount of precipitation influences energy conductivity in soil markedly, and hence also the size of the heat flux.

Keywords: Tatra Mountains, heat flux, active layer

Jarosław Baranowski [j.bar@twarda.pan.pl], Institute of Geography and Spatial Organization Polish Academy of Sciences, 00-818 Warsaw, Twarda 51/55, Poland